Brian Edwards Media

Archive for December, 2017

I Doff my Hat

Mike Hosking and Toni Street

I read that Mike Hosking and Toni Street are leaving TV1’s prime-time show Seven Sharp.

I’ve never been a fan of the somewhat brittle and abrasive Mr Hosking but I acknowledge his intelligence, interviewing skill and often caustic wit.

As for Toni Street, no-one could fail to be charmed by the warmth and generosity of her personality, her skill both as interviewer and occasional peacemaker and her good-humoured tolerance of her co-host. She came through the lens. And that is the highest compliment you can pay to any television broadcaster.

So we are losing a great and, I suspect, irreplaceable team. I doff my hat to them both. You will be missed. I will miss you.

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An Apology

Well, given the level of controversy and protest about my post concerning Guyon Espiner’s use of Te Reo on National Radio, I had several options:

*To defend the post;
*To take the post down;
*To explore the issue further;
*If necessary, to apologise for what I’d written.

I decided not to take the post down. I wrote it. People read it. Some approved of what I’d said. Others were deeply offended. Taking the post down would do nothing to change that.

But an apology to Guyon and Māori upset or angered by my comments is clearly required. I failed to check my facts, by taking the time to listen to several editions of Morning Report. Despite my own fairly extensive background on National Radio, Including Top of the Morning, Checkpoint, Jim Mora’s The Panel and a variety of other programmes, I’m not a frequent radio listener. But that won’t stand as an excuse. I should have checked.

I didn’t. Instead I simply assumed that listener complaints were justified, that non-Māori listeners were unable to understand significant parts of the body of the programme where the host was practicing his Te Reo.

That is clearly not the case. And for that I sincerely apologise.

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Much can be said on both sides – or can it?

Guyon Espiner

Disquiet is apparently being expressed by some National Radio listeners over what they claim to be Guyon Espiner’s excessive use of Maori words and phrases during his interviews. They don’t understand them. But Guyon’s wife is Maori and I find it entirely reasonable that her husband would want to be able to communicate with her and their children in both his own native tongue and hers.

So far so good. But should the same bilingualism be expected of Guyon’s primarily pakeha National Programme audience? Well, it’s entirely possible that more National and Concert Programme listeners understand Maori than listeners to commercial radio. But that’s hardly the point. English is the first and for many, including a majority of Tangata Whenua, the only language spoken and well understood by a considerable majority of New Zealanders. Read the rest of this entry »

19 Comments