Brian Edwards Media

Posts Tagged 'Colin Meads'

Why you should trust Brian’s Bountiful Bonds. (With Money-Back Guarantee and Free Advice for other TV personalities!)

Another 'Brian's Bountiful Bonds' winner!

Perhaps the most important precept in consumer affairs is ‘caveat emptor’ – let the buyer beware. I would have thought this applied as much to investing one’s life savings in a finance company offering above average returns as to buying a flat screen TV or washing machine from a discount store. More really, since in the first case we’re talking about hundreds of thousands of dollars while, in the second, maybe a few hundred bucks will be at stake and the product will be covered by the Consumer Guarantees Act anyway.

In the first instance, therefore, a sensible investor might be wise to get some advice from someone in the finance advisory sector, though preferably not from an advisor employed by the same bank that has a controlling stake in the finance company flogging the product. That advisor just might not be entirely objective… or honest.

On the other hand, an investor  might take the advice of Richard Long, a former television newsreader, on what to do with their retirement funds, or former sports broadcaster, Keith Quinn, on preparing for his or her own eventual demise, or former cricket captain, Stephen Fleming, on how to best warm or cool their home, or (if they prefer fencing paddocks to news-reading) former All Black, Colin Meads, on what to do with their retirement funds, or funny man Mike King on where to buy… well…  just about anything.

In every case that would be a pretty stupid thing to do, since Richard has no expertise in investing for retirement, Keith, despite appearances, is not  dead, Stephen probably couldn’t wire a fuse, Colin,  well, just  listen to the man, and Mike King tells jokes for a living, which really ought to be a warning in itself.   Read the rest of this entry »

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Brian’s Law of Celebrity Endorsement

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In the early 70s, not long after I left the ground-breaking current affairs television programme Gallery, I was approached by an advertising agency who wanted me to front a multi-media campaign for a publication called New Zealand Heritage. I was on the bones of my bum at the time and the appeal of making what I imagined would be a quick killing was considerable.

New Zealand Heritage was an educational part-work, a sort of New Zealand encyclopaedia in instalments. The editorial board behind the publication was a Who’s Who of eminent New Zealand scholars. It was an entirely respectable enterprise. Read the rest of this entry »

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