Brian Edwards Media

Brian Edwards and Judy Callingham offer professional and effective media training for people in both the private and public sectors.
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I’VE BEEN HACKED

MY EMAIL HAS BEEN HACKED BY SOMEONE CLAIMING TO BE ME. I’M APPARENTLY IN CYPRUS, HAVE LOST MY PASSPORT, MONEY AND ALL MY WORLDLY GOODS AND NEED ALL OF MY CONTACTS TO SEND ME 1400 EUROS SO THAT I CAN GET BACK HOME.

WE’RE WORKING ON IT, BUT IN THE MEANTIME DONT SEND ANY MONEY TO THIS CROOK PRETENDING TO BE ME.

I CAN’T COMMUNICATE BY EMAIL OR ON FACEBOOK OR TWITTER EITHER, BUT YOU CAN REACH US BY EMAILING:

judy@brianedwardsmedia.co.nz.

APOLOGIES AND THANKS

BRIAN

 

21 Comments

On Punishment and why we Kiwis can’t get enough of it.

Paremoremo

In an article in yesterday’s Sunday Star Times on the role of imprisonment in the rehabilitation of offenders, Sensible Sentencing Trust founder Garth McVicar expresses the view that the first priority of sending people to prison is to keep the public safe. It’s a relatively moderate statement from McVicar, expressing perhaps the philosophy behind the excellent work done by the Trust on behalf of the victims of crime.

A more characteristic expression of McVicar’s understanding of the proper function of imprisonment appears elsewhere in the article: His “second priority” is punishment:

“We shouldn’t be ashamed to talk about that. Criminals need to be punished for their actions.”

Mr McVicar is, according to the article, worried that our country’s prison policy is more concerned about helping inmates than punishing them. And he’s not a believer in rehabilitation:

“If you can rehabilitate those people then you would have rehabilitated them long before they were imprisoned. The problem is when they get to prison they’re not long off becoming a career criminal… We need to focus on punishment and then rehabilitation once they’ve served time.” Read the rest of this entry »

64 Comments , ,

On Vets, Specialists and Debt Collectors – A Rave!

Felix and Max

Felix and Max

On Monday, on Jim Mora’s Afternoons panel, I launched a full frontal assault on what I consider the avarice of two professions – vets and medical specialists.

My ire, in the case of the veterinary profession, was occasioned by the cost of treatment for our two cats, Max and Felix, amounting not to hundreds but to thousands of dollars in this year alone and to tens of thousands over their lifetime.

I should add that the care and treatment which the cats received was invariably excellent. I have no complaint on that score.

Nor have I any complaint about the care and treatment I’ve received from medical specialists, which is fortunate since I’m a confirmed and fully paid-up hypochondriac.

As with the vets, it’s less their fees which anger me than  their debt-collector mentality to payment.

This was exemplified in a consent form which I  recently had to sign before seeing a specialist. What seemed to me an inappropriate and offensive amount of space on the form was devoted to the perils of non-payment of the bill. When I remarked on this during the subsequent consultation, the specialist, to my surprise, entirely agreed. He didn’t like the form either and he hadn’t drawn it up. The professional body representing his specialist field had.   Read the rest of this entry »

24 Comments